Monday, July 4, 2016

Embossing Aluminum Foil


I got my Cuttlebug about a year ago, and I'm just beginning to scratch the surface of everything that you can do with it. Today I thought I'd share a tutorial for embossing aluminum foil. If you're looking for a tutorial to emboss paper with the Cuttlebug, click on this link: Cuttlebug Embossing Tutorial.


I used Reynolds Heavy Duty Aluminum Foil, but since it works best when folded into several layers, you could probably use a thinner/cheaper foil if you have one on hand. In the photo above, you can see a single layer of heavy duty foil. It has a nice deep emboss, as I folded it to go through the machine instead of running just a single layer through; however, if you rub your finger over the relief, it flattens out. To keep it from flattening out, you'll need to layer the foil.


I was using one of the wide rolls of foil and I ripped a section off the roll that was about 16 inches wide.


Then I folded it in half. Don't worry too much about the wrinkles. The busier your embossing pattern, the less you'll notice wrinkles.


I folded it in half again.


And then one more time to get it about the size of the embossing folder. At this point, it was 8 layers thick. You might be able to get away with fewer layers and still get a good relief, but I was more worried about getting the foil the right size for the machine.


Then I sandwiched it using the standard embossing order for the Cuttlebug: A spacer on bottom, B plate, then the embossing folder with the foil stuck in the middle, then another B plate on top. I ran the whole stack through the machine and it comes out with a perfect emboss. The 8-layers makes a really solid emboss. It won't flatten from simple handling or from running your finger across it. IT would flatten if you run your nail across it with the intention of flattening it (which would flatten a paper emboss too), though.


Next I decided to try and die cut the foil. I used some Cuttlebug shape dies (Labels and Such set) to punch out some shapes.


I used the standard die cut sandwich: A spacer plate on bottom, B plate, Dies, Foil, C plate on top. I ran the whole stack through the machine and it cut out cute little label shapes.


The nice thing about these die cuts is that they pinched together the layers of foil so they won't come apart without some serious fiddling. I might seal the edges with some mod podge or other glue, just in case, but they felt pretty secure.

These were so much fun to make. Like all embossing, it's such instant gratification, and then for it to be shiny and metallic too, you can't beat that. I can't wait to figure out what to use all of my embossed foil for.

Note: All of the embossing folders used in this post were purchased at Tuesday Morning and are Tim Holtz/Ranger brand or We R Memory Keepers/American Crafts brand.



19 comments:

  1. I have been card maker for about 30+ years just using cut paper, glue and some stickers and various other embellishments. Recently I bought some alcohol inks, some stamps, stamp pads, water colors, and a Cuttlebug. I also have purchased some embossing folders. No dies yet, but I am sure that's coming. I am a single, retired guy who loves to craft. I also have a Cricut, but not the newest one. I am having a ball trying new things and watching videos and visiting blogs. Your blog caught my eye with the embossed foil and alcohol inks. Can hardly wait to try it. Just wanted to say thank you for all your tips and ideas. Card on!!

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    1. I got my Spellbinder Grand Caliber machine a few months ago and having your experience learning something new every day and fortunately, I, too, live alone because meals wouldn't get prepared, chores done or other things done. I'm making my Xmas cards now. So, far have done 3. New ideas all time. Each one is different. I am keeping a photo log of all the cards I've created. Just an idea.

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  2. Thanks for sharing this and all the details. Looks great.

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  3. Can the aluminium embossing be done on recycled alyminium containers?

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    1. I have embossed on the reverse side of cut soda cans. Works great. These also take alcohol ink well too.

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    2. I haven't tried any other types of aluminum. Pop cans are now on my list to try! Thanks!

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  4. Well you live an learn . Great stuff. Gonna give it a go. Thank you for sharing. They look really good.

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    1. Thanks! I hope it turns out great if you try it!

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  5. Very pretty! I have to give this a try!

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  6. Love this idea of the aluminum foil. What you suggest for adhering it to a card?

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    1. Just some permanent double stick tape. I hope it works for you!

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  7. I use my Xyron to add adhesive to cardstock, adhere aluminum foil and then emboss. It is metallic on the front and paper on the back for easy gluing and it holds its shape very well.

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    1. That sounds like a great idea! I don't have a Xyron, but I'm sure the foil could be adhered in other ways. Thanks for stopping by!

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  8. I'm always looking for something new I will try this. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Thanks for stopping by the blog. I hope you have good results with your embossed foil.

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  9. I cover a piece of card stock was/heavy duty foil then emboss. Have done several making men's cards. Love the results. Going to try your method to see if I get the same. Thank you for sharing!

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    1. That's a great idea too! Do you attach the foil to the paper at all with tape or glue?

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