Monday, September 12, 2016

Trying Out Pinata Alcohol Inks


If you've been to my blog before, you know that I have made all kinds of projects with alcohol ink. But, in all of those projects, I used Ranger Inks (since they are more widely available at craft stores). Pinata alcohol inks are the other major brand (made by Jacquard), and I finally got myself a starter set


The Pinata set usually costs around $20 on Amazon and comes with 9 bottles of ink. So it's actually fairly comparable in price to the Ranger Inks, maybe even a little cheaper. The colors are all bright and vivid versions of yellow, orange, magenta, bright blue, purple, and green. It also comes with a black, white and a gold (which I didn't try my first time out).


I grabbed a 4-inch glossy ceramic tile to try the inks out on first. I'm pretty familiar with how the Ranger Inks behave on this surface, so I felt it would be a good comparison for me.


I decided to stamp the on my first one with cool colors. I dripped the inks onto my felt and covered the surface of the tile in one pass. The bottles didn't drip quite as much ink onto the felt as the Ranger bottles do and the ink seemed thicker and didn't spread out on the tile as much. The Ranger Inks will usually create a watercolor look unless you make multiple passes with the applicator.


I stamped the tile just a bit more to fill in some of the white space and then put some 90% rubbing alcohol onto my applicator and made another pass over the tile. The ink thinned out and behaved more like watercolors.


I ran my applicator over it some more and stippling occurred. I was really pleased with how the inks didn't seem to get muddled and brown in color, but still separated with the addition of the alcohol.


Next, I tried dripping some colors on the tile. Like with the applicator, the ink seemed thicker and didn't spread out as much on the tile.


So I used an eye dropper with some rubbing alcohol to try to spread the ink out.


I added a bit more ink and then used a can of air to spread it out a bit.


Then I used the eye dropper again with nearly no alcohol in it to blow some alcohol droplets onto the ink and get it to separate a bit. It behaved pretty much just like the Ranger Inks with this technique.


My two practice tiles turned out really neat. The biggest difference between the Pinata ink and the Ranger inks is that it seems to be a bit thicker/more saturated in color and will need to be thinned out with rubbing alcohol or a blending solution for it to behave the way I'm used to. I'm really looking forward to using this ink on some of the jewelry I've made with Ranger Inks in the past to get even more saturated color.


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